Like the labyrinth of a house that is Piranesi's private world, this story has many levels and fog-shrouded conceptions. It's the most unusual, metaphysical but also approachable and readable work I've encountered in a long time. The name Piranesi is not defined in the book, so I looked it up online. It turns out Piranesi was a real person, an architect and artist, in the 1700s famous for his etchings of Rome and of fictitious and atmospheric "prisons." Susanna Clarke seems to have seen these etchings and determined to inhabit them in a novel. Don't be afraid to enter the labyrinth to travel through a compelling highly imaginative tale that arrives at a satisfying conclusion.

Belfire206's rating:
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